All About Fiberglass-Free Mattress:

All About Fiberglass-Free Mattress:

Fiberglass is a composite material made of glass fibers and synthetic compounds that reinforces plastic. It’s versatile, low-cost, and highly durable, which is why it’s utilized in many industries and goods. Indeed, several manufacturers include fiberglass in their mattresses. Perhaps the last material you’d expect to find in the best mattress is fiberglass. However, it is a cost-effective method of complying with industrial fire rules and keeping you safe while resting in your lovely, comfortable — yet combustible — bed. Fiberglass is particularly prevalent in memory foam mattresses, which are exceedingly flammable. Not even all mattresses, however, contain fiberglass. Certain producers choose organic materials such as wool or thistle, which are far better. Most individuals are unaware their mattress has fiberglass until they remove the cover to clean it and discover their room is filled with numerous fiberglass strands. What is the mechanism through which fiberglass acts as a flame retardant? As a temperature insulator and thermal barrier, fiberglass functions as a protective layer that melts rather than burns freely if your mattress catches fire for whatever reason. Click on this link for more information: laweekly.com/best-mattress

Additionally, it retards the spread of fire; it will take longer for the flames to reach the flammable materials inside your mattress. That seems like a fantastic thing. To be honest, not so much.

Fiberglass in Mattresses: A Hazard

The fiberglass is often woven into the mattress, immediately under straight into the inner cover – of sight and mind. On the other hand, mattresses made of fiberglass can trigger inflammatory reactions in both children and adults. If you’ve ever come into contact with the cotton candy-like fiberglass insulation, you’re aware of how uncomfortable it can be on the skin. If your mattress cover becomes worn out or is removed for any reason, it can cause microscopic scratches and irritation across your skin, harm your eyes and lungs, and aggravate asthma symptoms if breathed. The stuff’s tiny fibers can even reach the bottom section of the lungs, raising the likelihood of more significant, unfavorable health impacts. Worse, once fiberglass has escaped from your mattress, it is nearly hard to remove. Indeed, it will contaminate every surface in your house – the air, carpet, furniture, and your clothing, to mention a few. It’s similar to dust that settles everywhere, only it’s made of tiny glass shards. As a result, fiberglass is prohibitively costly and extremely difficult to clean. According to one fiberglass-cleaning specialist, the cost of removing fiberglass fibers from your property can range between thousands and tens of thousands of dollars, depending on the severity of the condition. Thus, while fiberglass is an efficient flame retardant for mattresses, the associated health and cost hazards are just not worth it – especially when there are other, better flame-resistant materials available. When purchasing a mattress, you may also check for various health, and quality certifications that assure the materials will not produce severe health effects or expose you to dangerous materials. Additionally, restricting your search to organic or eco-friendly materials — which are often devoid of VOCs, chemicals, fiberglass, and the like — can make it simpler to find a bed that is safe for your health.